Istanbul Lovers

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Vasilia
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Istanbul Lovers

Post by Vasilia » Fri May 18, 2012 6:12 pm

I decided to start this topic for those who have fallen in love with Istanbul or those who want to learn a few things about this great City. Here we can share sites, blogs which are related to Istanbul, we can recommend museums, restaurants, bars, we can write about things we did there or we didn't and we wish to do them in a next trip, we can post photos, videos, documenatries about the city e.t.c. In a few words here we can write and post anything related to Istanbul, we can express and share our love for this unique City and maybe mentally we can "travel" there




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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Fri May 18, 2012 6:31 pm

i want to share a few great sites:

http://www.ibb.gov.t..._kameralar.aspx

this site has cameras placed in different places in Istanbul so you can have live image! just click on the photos! if you click on the Metrohan and Duatepe early in the morning, the view is just

http://harita.yandex...2&l=map,stv,sta

this is something like google earth! just click on the blue lines or type the place you want and there are images from the city. i have lost many valuable hours because of this site

and here are a few blogs:

http://istanbuleats.com/ (this blog recently won an important award)

http://www.virtualto...bul-TG-C-1.html

http://stamboultwilight.blogspot.com/

this music is nostalgic and reminds a lot of Istanbul


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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Fri May 18, 2012 9:07 pm

Hagia Sophia: the greatest example of Byzantine architecture.

here is a site with photos, video, history, the hours that the museum is open.

http://hagiasophiato...ide.com/museum/

Basilica cistern: it is the biggest of the many cisterns that exist under the Istanbul


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Post by xenya » Sat May 19, 2012 8:20 am

Vasilia, another lover in Istanbul. I like this thread, the idea to have a thread about Istanbul...

Congratulatins and thx.



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Post by Angel » Sat May 19, 2012 9:24 am

One of my absolute favorite places in Istanbul is The Pertevniyal Valide Sultan Mosque, also known as the Aksaray Valide Mosque (Turkish: Pertevniyal Valide Sultan Camii, Aksaray Valide Sultan Camii), is an Ottoman imperial mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. It is located at the intersection of Ordu Street and Atatürk Boulevard in the Aksaray neighborhood. It is located next to Pertevniyal High School (Turkish: Pertevniyal Lisesi) which was also built by the order of Sultana Pertevniyal in 1872. One of the last mosques built in Istanbul during the Ottoman Empire, the Pertevniyal Valide Sultan Mosque was built for the Sultana Pertevniyal, wife of Sultan Mahmud II and mother of Sultan Abdülaziz. It was designed by the Italian architect Montani. The construction work began in November 1869, and the mosque was finished in 1871. The building is a mixture of Turkish, Gothic, Renaissance, and Empire styles. It is also unique in the details of the rock work.


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Post by Angel » Sat May 19, 2012 9:25 am


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Post by Goldenkiss87 » Sat May 19, 2012 11:47 am

great thread Vasilia!!i like it alots


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Post by xenya » Sat May 19, 2012 1:00 pm

When we were in Istanbul last autumn, we bought this CD:

On the cover:

Istiklal Caddesi with this famous red tram who drives from Taksim square to the Tunel, which is one of the first underground railway in the world.

We bought this CD because of the music (saz is very interesting instrument and we are musical family) and because of the cover. This little red tram is big atraction and is fun to have a ride with him through the streets piled with people..... I mean realy piled....

Another interesting thing on Istiklal Caddesi (there is a lot of them, of course) is Inci bar with his famous profiteroles... Well... I ate them and I didn't like them much... but I've been there four months before FG&Kerim on their Valenitne's day.

Do you ever try Turkish ice-cream? It is very good, different from normal, as if it contained honey. But the most interesting with this Turkish ice-srem is the ice-cream seller.... Her it is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ip6INPAyvHM



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Post by Vasilia » Sun May 20, 2012 8:37 am

Chora Church

The Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora (Turkish Kariye Müzesi, Kariye Camii, or Kariye Kilisesi — the Chora Museum, Mosque or Church) is considered to be one of the most beautiful surviving examples of a Byzantine church. The church is situated in Istanbul, in the Edirnekapi neighborhood, which lies in the western part of the municipality (belediye) of Fatih. In the 16th century, the church was converted into a mosque by the Ottoman rulers, and it became a secularised museum in 1948. The interior of the building is covered with fine mosaics and frescoes.

The Chora Church is not as large as some of the other Byzantine churches of Istanbul (it covers 742.5 m²), but what it lacks in size, it makes up for in the beauty of its interior. The building divides into three main areas: the entrance hall or narthex, the main body of the church or naos, and the side chapel or parecclesion. The building has six domes: two in the esonarthex, one in the parecclesion and three in the naos. (wikipedia)

Chora Museum is worth visiting for those who are interested in Byzantine history and architecture. it is really beautiful in the interior!

one of the best thing i ate in Istanbul was simit! i know it is just a simit and we have it in Greece too(koulouri) but it was by far the best i had! if i could find frappe instead of tea i would be even happier


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Post by Vasilia » Sun May 20, 2012 9:09 am

Istiklal

my first night in the city was in Istiklal. i absolutely loved that street. it took me a couple of minutes to get over the shock! i don't think i have seen such a large and heterogenus crowd in my life! young and old people, modern and traditional women, locals and tourists!! but i think that is the beauty of that street! although the red tram, Xenya, was a litlle annoying


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Post by Angel » Mon May 21, 2012 3:17 am

The Maiden's Tower (Kız Kulesi), also known in the ancient Greek and medieval Byzantine periods as Leander's Tower (Tower of Leandros), sits on a small islet located at the southern entrance of Bosphorus strait 200 m (220 yd) off the coast of Üsküdar in Istanbul, Turkey

Maiden's Tower was first built by the ancient Athenian general Alcibiades in 408 BC to control the movements of the Persian ships in the Bosphorus. Back then the tower was located between the ancient cities of Byzantion and Chrysopolis. The tower was later enlarged and rebuilt as a fortress by the Byzantine emperor Alexius Comnenus in 1110 AD, and was restored and slightly modified several times by the Ottoman Turks, most significantly in 1509 and 1763. The most recent face lift was made in 1998. Steel supports were added around the ancient tower as a precaution after the 17 August 1999 earthquake.

Used as a lighthouse for centuries, the interior of the tower has been transformed into a popular café and restaurant, with an excellent view of the former Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman capital. Private boats make trips to the tower several times a day.

Today, there is a restaurant in the first floor and a café at the top of the tower. The tower was depicted on the reverse of the Turkish 10 lira banknotes of 1966-1981

Legend

There are many legends about the construction of the tower and its location. According to the most popular Turkish legend, a sultan had a much beloved daughter. One day, an oracle prophesied that she would be killed by a venomous snake on her 18th birthday. The sultan, in an effort to thwart his daughter's early demise by placing her away from land so as to keep her away from any snakes, had the tower built in the middle of the Bosphorus to protect his daughter until her 18th birthday. The princess was placed in the tower, where she was frequently visited only by her father.

On the 18th birthday of the princess, the sultan brought her a basket of exotic sumptuous fruits as a birthday gift, delighted that he was able to prevent the prophecy. Upon reaching into the basket, however, an asp that had been hiding among the fruit bit the young princess and she died in her father's arms, just as the oracle had predicted. Hence the name Maiden's Tower.

The older name Leander's Tower comes from another story about a maiden: the ancient Greek myth of Hero and Leander. Hero was a priestess of Aphrodite who lived in a tower at Sestos, at the edge of the Hellespont (Dardanelles). Leander (Leandros), a young man from Abydos on the other side of the strait, fell in love with her and would swim every night across the Hellespont to be with her. Hero would light a lamp every night at the top of her tower to guide his way.

Succumbing to Leander's soft words, and to his argument that Aphrodite, as goddess of love, would scorn the worship of a virgin, Hero allowed him to make love to her. This routine lasted through the warm summer. But one stormy winter night, the waves tossed Leander in the sea and the breezes blew out Hero's light, and Leander lost his way, and was drowned. Hero threw herself from the tower in grief and died as well. The name Maiden's Tower might also have its origins in this ancient story.

Due to the vicinity and similarity between the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus, Leander's story was attributed to the tower by the ancient Greeks and later the Byzantines.


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Post by xenya » Mon May 21, 2012 8:52 am

Istiklal

my first night in the city was in Istiklal. i absolutely loved that street. it took me a couple of minutes to get over the shock! i don't think i have seen such a large and heterogenus crowd in my life! young and old people, modern and traditional women, locals and tourists!! but i think that is the beauty of that street! although the red tram, Xenya, was a litlle annoying

Yes, the little red tram was a litlle annoying if you walked on the street or set in restaurant... constantly have to avoid it and it continuous sounds.... But when you are on it.... it's better....



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Post by Vasilia » Tue May 22, 2012 6:15 am

Angel, thanks for the information for this tower! i had no idea about its story and legends!! i liked the song too!


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Post by Vasilia » Wed May 23, 2012 1:26 pm


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Post by Vasilia » Thu May 24, 2012 6:02 pm


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Post by Vasilia » Thu May 24, 2012 6:27 pm

photos from the famous photographer Ara Guler


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Post by Vasilia » Thu May 24, 2012 6:40 pm


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Post by Vasilia » Thu May 24, 2012 6:44 pm

for more photos, you can visit his website http://www.araguler.com.tr/aboutaraguler.html

i think he owns a cafe in Istanbul which is decorated with his photos. does anyone know where it is?


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Post by xenya » Fri May 25, 2012 4:50 pm

I love Orhan Pamuk, novelist, screenwriter, academic and recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature. He was born in Istanbul where he lives.

I read almost all his books and one of them is dedicated to his city. The title of the book is Istanbul: Memories and the City.

This book is like, if I tell a simplified, very good turist guide book. If you prepare to go to Istanbul you must read it first. Here you can learn more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Istanbul:_Memories_and_the_City



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Post by Vasilia » Sat May 26, 2012 9:23 am

i want so much to read it Xenya. i have heard a lot about this book. i saw the book a couple of months ago in the bookstore and i was so tempted to buy it. but because i have serious exams now and 39 books of modern Greek literature to read, i leave it for the summer or after semptember when i am done with university

Orhan Pamuk recently opened a museum

http://www.hurriyetd...1&NewsCatID=386

and since we are talking about books, another book i want to read is "Going back to Constantinople/Istanbul:a city of absences" by Alex Massavetas.

this guy left a career in Law in Athens eight years ago and moved to Istanbul because he fell in love with the city and started from scratch. now he is a writer and journalist. i read a lot of his articles and i love his humor and how objectively and clear he sees things. and the things i read about his book are only positive!

In “The City of Absences”, Alex Massavetas links the lively, raucous present of Istanbul’s historic quarters with their past and the history of their original inhabitants. At the same time, he bypasses the feelings of nostalgia and melancholy and gives himself to the magic of modern Istanbul, to the joy of discovery, lets himself feel affection for the worlds he discovers and agony for their end approaching. The end, this time round, will be in the form of an “Urban Rehabilitation Programme”. This exhibition borrows its title from Alex’s book, a travelogue of Istanbul’s lost cosmopolitanism.

Visual memories of

eight years of wandering in the narrow alleys of Istanbul’s historical districts. An image diary from the lives of those who presently inhabit Pera, Tarlabasi, Phanari, Kumkapi, of the last artisans who retain shop in the old town’s caravanserais. Possibly the last images of the modest lives of those villagers who flooded the historic districts, as well as the entire city, in search of a better deal. Those lives are now under threat of exile in the periphery of the ever-extending megacity, retreating before the wave of “urban regeneration” which is sweeping over Istanbul.

These images will be immediately recognised by anyone who has ascended the precipitous seven hills of the old town, who has allowed oneself to be lost in the narrow, winding streets of Galata and Pera on the opposite shore of the Golden Horn: children made to sit on the window sills, the garlands of washing hanging over the streets to dry, the crowds of children filling the streets, the colourful street markets, the dyed pigeons used for races. Behind their prohibitive metal gates, the caravanserais of the old city shelter jewelers, tailors, artisans and manufacturers of all sorts.

Despite all this exuberance and movement, however, one’s every step in these quarters is accompanied by the undeniable traces of absence. Those who dwelt here until very recently – Greeks, Armenians, Jews – are conspicuous only by their absence. Some moved away to “upmarket” suburbs, but most fled abroad. The memory of their centuries-old presence and the sad story of their often forced exile sits heavily on the cityscape.

A sensitive eye will detect its traces pretty much everywhere. Locked up churches and synagogues, homes taken over by newcomers, cemeteries hidden behind tall walls, empty spaces turned car parks where magnificent apartment buildings once stood. In crumbling Belle Époque appartements in Pera and in much more modest houses in Kumkapi, Phanari and Balat, plaques carry the names of their architects, names now “exotic” and “foreign” to the average Turk.

In today’s Istanbul, absence weighs as heavily as presence on urban identity and culture. Right beside the megacity which is full of life lies the City of Absences, the city of memory. Istanbul drips melancholy and nostalgia. The all-pervasive sense of loss, the sad cry of the abandoned homes and shrines, of the desecrated cemeteries, the memory of a past evokes the feelings of nostalgia and sadness not only among the members of the members of the minorities, but also among the old Istanbul bourgeoisie. The latter expresses a longing, which grows stronger by the day, for the multicultural metropolis of the past obliterated during the 20th century.

Alex Massavetas was born and raised in Athens. He read law in Athens and Cambridge, but abandoned a career of a lawyer with much delight in 2003 and moved to Istanbul. The move was the result of a profound spell the space and time of the City had cast on him, a spell still very much in force. After experimenting with various jobs, he has been working as a freelance journalist for Greek and British media since 2003. Based in Istanbul, he now lives as a nomad between that city, London and Athens, not missing a chance to board a plane for a short escape further away. His camera is his travel companion and his notebook. At present, he says he is a traveller; he wants to become a writer when he grows up.


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Post by xenya » Mon May 28, 2012 7:24 am

A few weeks ago I saw a Greek movie...

It spoke about the expulsion of Greeks from Turkey (precisely from Istanbul) and the consequences of which are provoked by these events. Movie is displayed as an amusing story about grandfather, the Greek, which has remained in Istanbul and little boy/boy/man who always wanted to visit his grandfather but he never succeeded. Only when grandfather died, he returned (from Greece) to Istanbul where he met his child's love......

Very nice, humorous and meaningful movie....



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Post by Angel » Mon May 28, 2012 10:57 pm

loved this topic ... i know i will love the city as well


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Post by fatmagul fan » Tue May 29, 2012 4:10 am

A few weeks ago I saw a Greek movie...

It spoke about the expulsion of Greeks from Turkey (precisely from Istanbul) and the consequences of which are provoked by these events. Movie is displayed as an amusing story about grandfather, the Greek, which has remained in Istanbul and little boy/boy/man who always wanted to visit his grandfather but he never succeeded. Only when grandfather died, he returned (from Greece) to Istanbul where he met his child's love......

Very nice, humorous and meaningful movie....

I love this movie xenya!!!!

Here is the topic for this movie if someone is interested : http://board.whatisfatmagulsfault.com/index.php?/topic/153-a-touch-of-spice/


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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Sun Jun 03, 2012 9:28 am

has anyone seen this film with subtitles? it seems good!


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xenya
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Post by xenya » Sun Jun 03, 2012 4:34 pm

I did but with subs in Slovene. It was shown on our TV one month ago....



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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:01 am

i don't speak slovene

is it worth watching?


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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:11 am

how much i wish right now that instead of having exams, i would be in a boat in Bosporous


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xenya
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Post by xenya » Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:47 am

i don't speak slovene

is it worth watching?

How could you know Slovene. There are just few milions of us who speak it.

About film:

Yes. If you love music and Istanbul.



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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:05 am

How could you know Slovene. There are just few milions of us who speak it.

About film:

Yes. If you love music and Istanbul.

Zivjo! kako ste?

see? i can speak slovene!

i just found those two phrases on google!

ok! thanks. i wish i will find the movie with subs.

i have seen a few months ago a documentarie on tv about different styles of music in istanbul and it was really cool. i didn't want to post it at first because they speak Turkish and the subtitles are Greek but i like it a lot, so i post it for those who speak Greek or Turkish


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Vasilia
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Post by Vasilia » Wed Jul 04, 2012 4:54 pm

:droolsmiley:

:coffeescreen:


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