All Things Books III

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All Things Books III

Post by Meltem » Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:45 am

Welcome to All Things Books (ATB) III...





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Post by Meltem » Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:53 am

 

  Veiled Circassian woman, Jean Leon Gerome



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Post by Meltem » Sun Jan 29, 2017 1:17 am

 

A Partnership Larger Than Marriage: The Stunning Love Letters of Kahlil Gibran and Mary Haskell

 

 

“You are like the Great Spirit, who befriends man not only to share his life, but to add to it. My knowing you is the greatest thing in my days and nights, a miracle quite outside the natural order of things.” BY MARIA POPOVA

 

Nearly a century after his death, the Lebanese-American painter, poet, and philosopher Kahlil Gibran (January 6, 1883–April 10, 1931) endures as one of humanity’s most universally beloved voices of truth and transcendence. But there would have been no Gibran as we know and love him without the philanthropist and patron of the arts Mary Elizabeth Haskell — his greatest champion, frequent collaborator, and unusual beloved. 

Haskell and Gibran met on May 10, 1904, at a friend’s studio. He was twenty-one and she nearly thirty-one. Impressed with his art, Haskell soon offered to send Gibran to Paris to study painting, with a stipend of $75 a month, equivalent to about $2,000 today. He accepted. In a letter to a friend written shortly before he departed for Paris in 1908, Gibran described Haskell as “a she-angel who is ushering me toward a splendid future and paving for me the path to intellectual and financial success.” Shortly after arriving, he wrote: “The day will come when I shall be able to say, ‘I became an artist through Mary Haskell.'”

But the open hands of Haskell’s generosity branched from an equally open heart, from some larger kindness of which Gibran soon became enamored. He came to see her as more than a benefactress — a kindred spirit, a woman of uncommon tenderness, and, above all, a person willing to descend into the deepest trenches of his psyche and climb to its highest mounts in order to understand him, which he considered the greatest measure of love. It was through her generosity that he survived as an artist, and it was through her selfless love that he found himself as a man.

In one of his first letters to Haskell from Paris, Gibran captures what is perhaps the greatest gift of love, whatever its nature — the gift of being seen by the other for who one really is:

It seemed to me that it was the moment of the opening of the door between Kahlil and the world that shall love him and into whose heart he shall surely feel he is pouring his work. I think his future is not far away now!

And so I made up my mind to follow what seems to me the final finger of God — I put definitely to myself the possibility of being his wife. And though every waking hour since has been drenched with inner tears, I know I am right, and that the tears mean joy, not pain, for the future. My age is simply the barrier raised between us and the blunder of our marrying. Not my age constitutes the objection — but the fact that for Kahlil there waits a different love from that he bears me — an apocalypse of love — and that shall be his marriage. His greatest work will come out of that — his greatest happiness, his new, full life. And it is not many years distant. Toward the woman of that love, I am but a step. And though my susceptible eyes weep, I think of her with joy — and I don’t want to have Kahlil, because I know she is growing somewhere for him, and that he is growing for her.

Kahlil Gibran, “Four Faces,” heavily inspired by Haskell.

The following year, as Gibran continues to struggle, she grants him the ultimate gift of love — the equal embrace of his inner darkness and his inner light:

Your work is not only books and pictures. They are but bits of it. Your work is You, not less than you, not parts of you… These days when you “cannot work” are accomplishing it, are of it, like the days when you “can work.” There is no division. It is all one. Your living is all of it; anything less is part of it. — Your silence will be read with your writings some day, your darkness will be part of the Light.

Kahlil Gibran, “Spirit of Light”

 

When I am unhappy, dear Mary, I read your letters. When the mist overwhelms the “I” in me, I take two or three letters out of the little box and reread them. They remind me of my true self. They make me overlook all that is not high and beautiful in life. Each and every one of us, dear Mary, must have a resting place somewhere. The resting place of my soul is a beautiful grove where my knowledge of you lives.

   

Read other excerpts from the book:

https://www.brainpickings.org/2017/01/20/kahlil-gibran-mary-haskell-love-letters/?utm_source=Brain+Pickings&utm_campaign=82c21edbf8-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_01_27&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_179ffa2629-82c21edbf8-234369485&mc_cid=82c21edbf8&mc_eid=8702ff4814



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Post by Meltem » Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:15 am



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Post by nightstar » Mon Jan 30, 2017 5:18 am

6 minutes ago, Diziashq said:

Glad that you liked it Canim 

Yes, u r absolutely right

When do u watch ÖK.... live or next day... missed u on that thread

 

I watch it the next day bcs I can't watch online. I'm sure if I could watch online, I couldn't do a proper live translation, may be just could give the important and critical infos onlin. The conversations and the relations are so profound and dense, I liked it so much .. so so so much and I want to sip it, to inhale it .. ÖK is a kind of dizi that you have to be silent to sense and hear it. It needs to be comprehended.  I don't follow fragmnans, and I stayed away from the discussions purposely. Every episode till now has enlarged our conception and I think there are many aspects which should be developed and added to give a complete vision of the story. I'm so happy for Engin, ÖK is a respectable and worthy project.  


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Post by Meltem » Mon Jan 30, 2017 7:22 am

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Post by Andrijana » Mon Jan 30, 2017 8:01 am

Apparently, I missed my anniversary on the forum yesterday

4 years with you guys  

Love you, my beautiful ATB friends

 


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Post by Meltem » Tue Jan 31, 2017 3:03 am

 

Dear Dad, Send Money – Letters from Students in the Middle Ages

If you have a son or daughter attending university, most likely you will be getting a message from them asking for money. Apparently, this is part of a long tradition that goes back to the beginning of universities in the Middle Ages.

 

 

The idea that students ask their parents for money is not a new phenomenon – it began soon after the emergence of universities in medieval Europe. As one medieval Italian father puts its, “a student’s first song is a demand for money, and there will never be a letter which does not ask for cash.”

Here is a typical example from the 1220s:

B. to his venerable master A., greeting This is to inform you that I am studying at Oxford with the greatest diligence, but the matter of money stands greatly in the way of my promotion, as it is now two months since I spent the last of what you sent me. The city is expensive and makes many demands; I have to rent lodgings, buy necessaries, and provide for many other things which I cannot now specify. Wherefore I respectfully beg your paternity that by the promptings of divine pity you may assist me, so that I may be able to complete what I have well begun. For you must know that without Ceres and Bacchus Apollo grows cold.

Some students made sure to note how well they were doing at university before making their appeal for money. In this twelfth-century letter from France, two brothers lay it on thick:

To their very dear and respectable parents M. Matre, knight, and M. his wife, M. and S., their sons, send greetings and filial obedience.

This is to inform you that, by divine mercy, we are living in good health in the City of Orleans, an are devoting ourselves wholly to study, mindful of the words of Cato, ‘To know anything is praiseworthy.’ We occupy a good dwelling, next door but one to the schools and market-place, so that we can go to school every day without wetting our feet. We have also good companions in the house with us, well advanced in their studies and of excellent habit – an advantage which we well appreciate, for as the Psalmist says, ‘With an upright man thou wilt show thyself upright’. Wherefore lest production cease from lack of material, we beg your paternity to send us by the bearer, B., money for buying parchment, ink, a desk, and other things which we need, in sufficient amount that we may suffer no want on your account (God forbid!) but finish our studies and return home with honour. The bearer will also take charge of the shoes and stockings which you have to send us, and any news as well.

There are many examples of letters home with demands for support, along with a few replies in which the parents send money along with admonitions against spending it too quickly. Perhaps the best example of a medieval student asking a parent for money comes from the French writer Eustache Deschamps (1346-1406). In his youth he attended the University of Orleans before going on to work for the King of France. In the year 1400 he penned this imaginary letter from a student to his father:

Well beloved father, I have not a penny, nor can I get any save through you, for all things at the University are so dear, nor can I study in my Code or my Digest [these are legal texts], for their leaves [pages] have the falling sickness. Moreover, I owe ten crowns to the provost, and can find no man to lend them to me. I ask of you greetings and money.

The student has need of many things if he will profit here; his father and his kin must supply him freely so that he will not be compelled to pawn his book, but will have ready money in his purse, with gowns and and furs and decent clothing; or he will be damned for a beggar; wherefore, that men may not take me for a beast, I ask of you greetings and money.

Wines are expensive, as are hostels and other good things; I owe in every street, and am hard put to free myself from such snares. Dear father, deign to help me! I fear being excommunicated; already I have been cited, and there is not even a dry bone in my larder. If I cannot find money before this feast of Easter, the church door will be shut in my face; wherefore grant my supplication. I ask of you greetings and money.

Well beloved father, to ease my debts contracted to the tavern, at the baker’s, with the professors and the beadles, and to pay my subscriptions to the laundress and the barber, I ask of you greetings and money.

~ Medievalists.net

You can read more this topic in Charles H. Haskins’ article, “The Life of Medieval Students as Illustrated by their Letters” and the book The University in Medieval Life, 1179-1499, by Hunt Janin.



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Post by Igiso » Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:57 am

 

Transparency in nature 

»»-------------¤-------------«« »»-------------¤-------------«« »»-------------¤-------------«« »»-------------¤-------------««

 


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Post by Meltem » Fri Feb 03, 2017 8:35 am

 

“One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.”

~ Henry Miller

 

 



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Post by Meltem » Fri Feb 03, 2017 8:39 am

 

PHAGOMANIA

a compulsive desire to eat; insane hunger.

: fromAncient Greek  > from , “I ate”, “I devoured” + , “madness”.



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Post by Meltem » Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:20 am

 Quite the couple. 

 

When I first taught in Saudi Arabia, our neighborhood was newly built and considered on the far outskirts of town - a quiet area with few buildings & people.

We did, however, have a neighborhood rooster that liked to crow night & day...and heralded every car that ventured down our little street. 

Although I taught in a school, I also tutored kids when I returned home, and so many kids came to know our community crower as well.

During short breaks, I began making up stories of the rooster's daily escapades and, to this day, those kids, long grown up & wanderers in the world themselves, bring up those stories in emails and phone calls to me. They believed them, of course. Is there nothing better than setting a kid's imagination on fire with stories made out of thin air? There's a power in story telling that makes one almost giddy. 

I described our rooster's character as being overly self important and pompous in the way he conducted himself in the community. 

And while his confidence grew & grew, he not only welcomed the day's first rays, but also crowed in answer to the muezzin's calls to prayer. 

Not everyone liked this about him. So, one day while he was enjoying the sound of his voice, he failed to notice a cat sneak up behind him.

Now, this cat was well known too. He was the leader of all the stray cats for several blocks in all directions - primarily because of his girth.

Not skinny and fast on his feet like other alley cats - no, this tough guy was fat with eyes like slits that slid over you as you walked past.

You couldn't trust him as far as you could throw him - and that wasn't far.

 

Oops! Need to go! 

 

 

 

 



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Post by Martha » Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:28 am

3 minutes ago, Meltem said:

 Quite the couple. 

 

When I first taught in Saudi Arabia, our neighborhood was newly built and considered on the far outskirts of town - a quiet area with few buildings & people.

We did, however, have a neighborhood rooster that liked to crow night & day...and heralded every car that ventured down our little street. 

Although I taught in a school, I also tutored kids when I returned home, and so many kids came to know our community crower as well.

During short breaks, I began making up stories of the rooster's daily escapades and, to this day, those kids, long grown up & wanderers in the world, bring up those stories in emails and phone calls to me. They believed them, of course. Is there nothing better than setting a kid's imagination on fire with stories made out of thin air? There's a power in story telling that makes one almost giddy. 

I described our rooster's character as being overly self important and pompous in the way he conducted himself in the community. 

And while his confidence grew & grew, he not only welcomed the day's first rays, but also crowed in answer to the muezzin's call to prayer. 

Not everyone liked this about him. So, one day while he was enjoying the sound of his voice, he failed to notice a cat sneak up behind him.

Now, this cat was well known too. He was the leader of all the stray cats for several blocks in all directions - primarily because of his girth.

Not skinny and fast on his feet like other alley cats - no, this tough guy was fat with eyes like slits that slid over you as you walked past.

You couldn't trust him as far as you could throw him - and that wasn't far.

 

Oops! Need to go! 

 

 

 

 

What happened next?! I WANT more! I NEED more!

Not skinny and fast on his feet like other alley cats - no, this tough guy was fat with eyes like slits that slid over you as you walked past.

I can imagine him so clearly, his fur like a tiger's, only in the grey and brown colors, his eyes green and following


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Post by Martha » Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:33 am


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Post by Igiso » Fri Feb 03, 2017 10:34 am

1 hour ago, Meltem said:

 I began making up stories of the rooster's daily escapades

Do tell us... 

You must be a great story teller... 


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Post by Igiso » Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:52 am

Moments from teachers' life...


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Post by Igiso » Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:55 am

 


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Post by Laura D. » Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:56 am

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Post by Laura D. » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:00 pm

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Post by Igiso » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:03 pm

The Golden Age of Wife Selling (Better than a Divorce!) 

Let's say you're an 18th-century British peasant, and you and your wife just aren't getting along anymore. What do you do? Divorce her? Too expensive. Kill her? Too risky. Oh well, looks like you'll have to auction her off. Welcome to the wacky world of wife selling!

One of the earliest recorded wife sales took place in 1733, in Birmingham, central England. The local paper of the day records how "Samuel Whitehouse ... sold his wife, Mary Whitehouse, in open market, to Thomas Griffiths. Value, one guinea [about one English pound]." As part of the deal, the paper comments, Griffiths was to take Mary "with all her faults."

http://www.neatorama.com/2008/02/19/the-golden-age-of-wife-selling-better-than-a-divorce/


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Post by Laura D. » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:05 pm

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Post by Laura D. » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:14 pm

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Post by Inga » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:32 pm

Black History month-Haiti

Where are my Greek friends. Did you learn this in class?

On the first day of 1804 and after 14 years of violent conflicts between the African slaves and French colonists, Haiti made history by being the first independent African nation in the world. 16 years later, the declaration of the Greek Revolution against the ruling Ottoman Empire received a warm response in Haiti. Not only was Haiti the first country that recognized the Greek War of Independence and the Greek state but 100 volunteers also departed from the island to join Greeks. Unfortunately those brave men never arrived in Greece, probably because of a pirate attack on their ship. It is interesting, however, how the free nation of ex-slaves viewed its role in the world supporting the liberation of slaves worldwide. Jean-Pierre Boyer, President of Haiti, responded positively to the requests of the Paris Greek Committee in 1822 to help Greece . In his letter to the Committee, he said that Haitian government would like to support the fair Greek Revolution by sending money to revolutionaries to purchase weapons. The young republic did like to help financially but it couldn’t, because of the extreme poverty of the island. The truth is that Haiti did find another way to help. It sent 25 tons coffee beans to the revolutionaries, in order to be sold to buy weapons.

 

 


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Post by Igiso » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:55 pm

23 minutes ago, Maman said:

was Haiti the first country that recognized the Greek War of Independence and the Greek state

100 volunteers also departed from the island to join Greeks.


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Post by Inga » Fri Feb 03, 2017 1:01 pm

4 minutes ago, Igiso said:


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Post by Inga » Fri Feb 03, 2017 1:04 pm

3 hours ago, Martha said:

Love her and I read her books


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Post by Igiso » Fri Feb 03, 2017 1:10 pm

6 minutes ago, Maman said:


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Post by nightstar » Fri Feb 03, 2017 1:17 pm

3 hours ago, Martha said:

The best response I've read regarding to recent news and commands, is the announcement of Asghar Farhadi the Iranian Oscar winner Directer. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/29/movies/trump-immigration-oscars-iranian-director-asghar-farhadi.html?_r=0

This is part of his massage:

 

I would therefore like to convey via this statement what I would have expressed to the press were I to travel to the United States. Hard-liners, despite their nationalities, political arguments and wars, regard and understand the world in very much the same way. In order to understand the world, they have no choice but to regard it via an “us and them” mentality, which they use to create a fearful image of “them” and inflict fear in the people of their own countries.

This is not just limited to the United States; in my country hardliners are the same. For years on both sides of the ocean, groups of hardliners have tried to present to their people unrealistic and fearful images of various nations and cultures in order to turn their differences into disagreements, their disagreements into enmities and their enmities into fears. Instilling fear in the people is an important tool used to justify extremist and fanatic behavior by narrow-minded individuals.

However, I believe that the similarities among the human beings on this earth and its various lands, and among its cultures and its faiths, far outweigh their differences. I believe that the root cause of many of the hostilities among nations in the world today must be searched for in their reciprocal humiliation carried out in its past and no doubt the current humiliation of other nations are the seeds of tomorrow’s hostilities. To humiliate one nation with the pretext of guarding the security of another is not a new phenomenon in history and has always laid the groundwork for the creation of future divide and enmity. I hereby express my condemnation of the unjust conditions forced upon some of my compatriots and the citizens of the other six countries trying to legally enter the United States of America and hope that the current situation will not give rise to further divide between nations.

Asghar Farhadi, Iran


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Lorelai
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Post by Lorelai » Fri Feb 03, 2017 1:19 pm

11 hours ago, Meltem said:

 

Uff! 

Wonderfull photo! I really love dancing and I love even more watching dancers dance the way those in the photo do.

10 hours ago, Meltem said:

9 hours ago, Meltem said:

Warning! A bad word.

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again!!

4 hours ago, Meltem said:

 

PHAGOMANIA

a compulsive desire to eat; insane hunger.

: fromAncient Greek  > from , “I ate”, “I devoured” + , “madness”.

I know exactly what it means..Today I ate without realising it so many chocolate cookies!! (I lost counting them) No dinner for me tonight..


“…Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux
Mais c’est notre amour à tous les deux…”


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Meltem
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Post by Meltem » Fri Feb 03, 2017 1:31 pm

Asghar Farhadi is a brilliant artist, and what he said is the absolute truth. We are all more similar than different, and hardliners are everywhere - no one country or people is immune to such destructive agendas. We all need to rise above this growing trend in the world -  loudly call it what it is and do all we can to work against its divisiveness.



ObEEPPv.gif



“Nolite te bastardes carborundorum."



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